PMBOK 6 vs PMBOK 7

In August of 2021, PMI released the PMBOK 7th Ediiton.  I have a previous post describing what's new. Surprisingly, is a book filled with professional soft-skills, and not really a process-guide for executing projects.  Wihile PMBOK 1-6 Editions contain step-by-step process guidance for project execution, PMBOK 7 is all about the soft skills.

I tell my PMP and CAPM students they will need both, and an easy way to think about it is to use PMBOK 6 for learning how to manage projects, and PMBOK 7 for learning how to be an excellent project manager.  One analogy I used in a recent public presentation is that PMBOK 6 is the bones, and PMBOK 7 is the meat.

Mike Berry  Red Rock Research

 

 

PMBOK 7 Announced!

In August of this year (2021), the Project Management Institute will release PMBOK 7!  This edition will be different than past editions of the PMBOK as PMI is emphasizing a descriptive program versus a prescriptive program.

The new Project Management Body of Knowledge will contain 12 Project Management Principles, which help guide decisions, 8 Project Performance Domains, and 7 Model Sets.  They are as follows:

 

12 Project Management Principles:

 

  • Stewardship
  • Team
  • Stakeholders
  • Value
  • Systems Thinking
  • Leadership
  • Tailoring
  • Quality
  • Complexity
  • Risk
  • Adaptability and Resilience
  • Change

 

 

8 Project Performance Domains:

 

  • Stakeholders
  • Team
  • Development Approach and Life cycle
  • Planning
  • Project Work
  • Delivery
  • Measurement
  • Uncertainty

 

7 Model Sets

 

  • Situational Leadership
  • Communications Models
  • Motivation Models
  • Change Models
  • Complexity Models
  • Project Team Development Models
  • Other Models
In addition, some definitions are expanded upon. One example is thinking of your organization as a System of Value Delivery.

Something a little awkward is that the book is actually 3 separate texts, glued together--complete with their own page numbering systems and indexes.

 

PMBOK 6 Announced!

September 6, 2017,  PMI will release Version 6 of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) Guide.  The updates in the new guide reflect slight adjustments to the framework expanding it to encompass managing equipment as well as human resources, and changing terminology from “control” to “monitor” in many areas.  In addition, PMI will publish the new Agile Practice Guide which will become PMI’s definitive resource for all things Agile.   

The PMP and CAPM tests will not change until January, 2018.

 

Knowledge Area Changes:

• Project Time Management > Project Schedule Management

• Project Human Resource Management > Project Resource Management

 

Process Name Changes:

• Plan Stakeholder Management > Plan Stakeholder Engagement (Planning)

• Plan Human Resource Management > Plan Resource Management (Planning)

• Perform Quality Assurance > Manage Quality (Executing)

• Control Communications > Monitor Communications (M&C)

• Control Risks > Monitor Risks (M&C)

• Control Stakeholder Engagement > Monitor Stakeholder Engagement (M&C)

 

New Processes:

• Manage Project Knowledge (Added to Executing)

• Implement Risk Responses (Added to Executing)

• Control Resources (Added to M&C)

 

Deleted processes:

• Close Procurement’s


Advice for Passing the PMP Exam

The PMP, or Project Management Professional certification, indicates a person possesses years of industry experience participating in projects, and they understand the PMBOK framework.

The PMBOK, or Project Management Body of Knowledge, is a framework comprising 42 processes useful to managing formal projects.

Legendary in the industry, the PMP exam is one of the toughest professional exams out there.  It consists of 200 questions and takes most people the entire 4 hour allotment of time to complete.

The test is put together using Blooms Taxonomy, a learning framework that describes different ways people process learned information.   Recalling lists versus selecting the best option from a set of viable options are examples of categories in Blooms Taxonomy.

One major tip for passing the PMP exam is to expect to be reading questions in street lingo.  For example, the question may be a short story about a manager asking for something from her project manager.  The question will contain no terminology...you will be expected to translate the street lingo into the particular framework component being described and select the correct answer from the choices given.

I teach a PMP Exam Prep class and have many students who pass, and a few who don't.  What's the difference?  Quality study time.  Be sure you take this exam seriously so that you can benefit from the PMBOK framework concepts.

Mike J. Berry, PMP, CAPM, CBAP, ITIL, ACP, CSP, CSM, CSPO
John C. Maxwell Leadership Coach
www.RedRockResearch.com